Superior Smiles provides the highest level of care, and the most cutting-edge technology available. We make visits to the dentist a comfortable experience. Our patients experience the latest technology for patient comfort and state-of-the-art care, including Digital Records and Digital X-Rays, the highest sterilization standards, and even entertainment in the operatories.

Superior Smiles offers the following services to meet your dental needs:

Teeth Whitening
Porcelain Veneers
Bonding
Crowns
Bridges
Dental Implant Restorations
Tooth Colored Fillings
Root Canals
Dentures & Partials
Full Mouth Rehabilitation
Bite appliances for TMJ Treatment
Extractions
Dental Cleanings



    Teeth Whitening

KOR Teeth Whitening

Click on the graphic to the left to find out more about KöR® Whitening Deep Bleaching™ System


The KöR® Teeth Whitening system is a superior choice because the bleaching product is quality controlled from manufacture through shipping and final delivery to the patient.  This means that the active ingredient in the bleach itself suffers no break down before it is actually applied to the teeth which ultimately translates into a better whitening result.


ZOOM Teeth Whitening

Click on the graphic to the left to find out more about Zoom!™ One-Hour whitening from Discus Dental, the worldwide leader in tooth whitening.


©2012 Discus Dental, Discus Dental is now part of Philips Oral Healthcare, Philips and Philips Sonicare are registered trademarks of Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V


Opalescence Teeth Whitening

Click on the graphic to the left to find out more about Opalescence® Tooth Whitening Systems


Opalescence is a very cost effective choice for someone wanting to whiten their smile with a dentist supervised perscription strength bleaching procedure using custom made, comfortable trays that are scalloped around the teeth for maximum effectiveness.




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    Porcelain Veneers

Porcelain Veneers

A veneer is a thin, semi-translucent laminate (veneer) made of porcelain that is permanently bonded to the front of the tooth. Veneers are an aesthetic alternative to treat a variety of dental conditions including:


  • Crooked teeth
  • Spaces between teeth
  • Underbite
  • Teeth worn from grinding
  • Broken or chipped teeth
  • Stained or washed-out fillings
  • Spot discoloration that can't be corrected with bleaching
  • Whitening teeth when bleaching just isn't enough

Advantages and Benefits of Veneers

There are many benefits and advantages with porcelain veneers:

  • Can take years off your appearance without any invasive surgery
  • Actual treatment usually involves only two visits
  • Only a conservative amount of tooth structure is removed during the procedure
  • Veneers are the most biocompatible material you can use next to the gingiva (gums)
  • A healthy "natural" look is achieved; in fact, porcelain veneers are the most aesthetic restoration in dentistry

How are Veneers different from Bonding?

Bonding was a popular term used for several years to describe the use of tooth colored filling material to make cosmetic changes to the front teeth. With the great advances in porcelain veneer materials, bonding is not nearly as popular today. However, it can still be used as a more economical alternative to porcelain veneers. The disadvantage to bonding is that the resin material does not have the same luster as porcelain and it can stain and discolor over time whereas porcelain does not. Today, we use bonding primarily to fill in small surfaces or cavities and to repair chips in teeth.

How are Veneers different from Crowns?

A full crown is needed when a tooth has had root canal treatment or when a substantial amount of the entire tooth structure has been lost to decay or trauma. In these cases, the tooth needs to be completely covered by the restoration and the restoration serves to fortify and preserve the tooth. So, with a crown, the entire tooth is involved, whereas with a porcelain veneer, only the front of the tooth is involved. While a porcelain crown can be a beautiful restoration, the primary purpose for placing a crown is rarely cosmetics.

How are Porcelain Veneers done?

At the first appointment, the teeth are conservatively prepared for the veneers and an impression is taken. This impression is then sent to a lab where each porcelain veneer is custom made to the dentist's specifications. The lab process takes approximately 2-3 weeks. In the meantime, temporary veneers may or may not be placed on your teeth. If very little tooth structure was removed to prepare your teeth for the veneers, temporaries might not be used. The gums are generally much healthier at the veneer delivery appointment if no temporaries are placed. However, temporaries will be placed if it is cosmetically necessary.

What to Expect

Veneers can last indefinitely, depending on how well you care for them. And, because they are made of porcelain, veneers are resistant to staining and discoloration and, once applied to the teeth, they are very strong. To ensure that your veneers keep their natural, beautiful look, you must maintain regular oral hygiene at home and visit us for routine cleanings and exams. Another important point is that oral habits that can damage natural teeth such as nail biting, opening bobby pins, and chewing on hard objects can also damage your new veneers. So, once your veneers are applied, just care for them like your natural teeth and you will get many years of benefit from a beautiful smile.

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    Bonding

Bonding

Bonding is a term that refers to the use of tooth colored filling material being used to enhance the appearance of the front teeth. Bonding is most often used to close spaces, replace worn enamel, repair broken or chipped teeth, reshape crooked or misaligned teeth, and cover permanently stained or discolored teeth.

Bonding can be used to.....

  • repair chipped teeth
  • close gaps between teeth
  • improve appearance of tooth color
  • repair decays in front teeth
  • improve overall contour and arch form
  • as an economical alternative to porcelain veneers (although bonding is not as strong as porcelain or as resistant to staining and it will likely have to be touched up or redone years down the road)

Bonding is done in a single office visit and often times can be done without anesthesia. Due to advances in dental materials, there is a wide variety of shade selection so that the restoration can blend perfectly with your own tooth structure (if repairing a tooth) or can be used on all of the "smile-visible" teeth to whiten and brighten your smile. Which ever the case, bonding can provide significant esthetic improvements. People some times have no idea how greatly their smile can be improved by a simple procedure like getting a chip repaired or a gap closed. Consult with Dr. Kenny to find out how a simple bonding procedure might enhance your smile.

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    Crowns

Crowns and Bridges

A dental crown (cap) is a restoration that covers the entire tooth. Because it completely surrounds the tooth, it serves to hold the tooth together and protect it. A tooth might be diagnosed as needing a crown for any one of several reasons including.....

  • extensive loss of tooth structure from decay
  • large existing restoration that is failing (leaking)
  • the tooth has a fracture(s)
  • the tooth has had root canal therapy
  • to correct occlusion (your bite)
  • as part of a full mouth reconstruction.

If any of these conditions exists, the dentist will tell you that your tooth should have a crown. In some cases, a crown may be required in order to save the tooth from needing to be extracted at a later date. Placing a crown on a tooth almost always improves the esthetics of the tooth also. The crown edge meets with the tooth under the gums so that it looks like your natural tooth. Crowns can be beautiful restorations that last many years, possibly even decades.

How is a Crown Done?

Your tooth will be numbed first. Then the dentist will remove all of the existing filling and any decay from the tooth. The tooth will be built back up to a solid core with special filling material. Next, the tooth perimeter and top of the tooth will be reduced to make room for the crown to be placed over the tooth. There must be enough tooth structure removed to allow room for the crown to be thick enough to be strong and yet not be too bulky for the space it is placed into. Once the tooth has been "prepared" as described, an impression will be made. This impression is sent to a lab where your crown is custom fabricated. *Note - Dr. Kenny has used the same Dallas-based lab since 1989.* While your crown is being made (this takes about 2 weeks), you will have a temporary crown covering your tooth. When you return to have your new crown delivered, you may not even have to be numbed (this is determined by the dentist on a case-by-case basis). Once your crown is cemented on the tooth, you should care for it just like your other natural teeth. After all, your natural tooth IS still there under the cover and protection of your beautiful new crown.

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    Bridges

Bridges

If a person has a missing tooth/teeth for any length of time, even just one tooth, many problems can arise. The adjacent and opposing teeth can begin to shift. This shift can cause problems with the bite and can lead to periodontal disease (gum disease) as well. In addition, small spaces can open up in other areas of the mouth and cause food packing which can lead to cavities on other teeth and bad breath. So, when a tooth/teeth are lost, it is very important to get them replaced in a timely fashion.

Bridges

A bridge is a restoration that is used to replace one or more missing teeth. Teeth adjacent to the space are reduced to receive crowns (as described above). These holder crowns are connected with the replacement tooth crown. When these holders crowns are cemented onto their teeth, the replacement tooth crown touches against the tissue of the missing tooth space and it looks, feels and functions like your natural tooth.

Bridge 3

Bridges

Bridges

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    Dental Implant Restorations

Implants

When permanent teeth are lost, regardless of the reason or the number of teeth lost, dental implants can be a great alternative to replace them. Implants can be used to replace each tooth individually, to support a fixed bridge or to support a removable prosthesis (denture). There are many advantages to using implants to replace missing teeth. These advantages include.....




  • the adjacent teeth are not affected at all (they don't have to be reduced to support a bridge)
  • slows or prevents the bone resorption that naturally occurs at an extraction site
  • feels, functions and looks like you have your natural tooth back
  • for 35 years, has a success rate of over 95%
  • in some cases, may be the only alternative to having a removable appliance

How is an Implant Done?

While Dr. Kenny restores implants with beautiful crowns, she does not actually place the implant. You will be referred to a specialist that she will work very closely with on your behalf. Dr Kenny brings an implant specialist into her office once a month to accomodate her patients. At the placement appointment, the specialist will numb the area and surgically place the implant (which is a titanium post) into the jaw bone under the gums. This is relatively quick and atraumatic (even though it sounds scary - it really is not). The implant usually needs 3-4 months to become fully integrated (your bone attach to it so that it is strong). During this time, nothing is visible to you. You still have a space. If this is a back tooth, you might not even need a temporary replacement tooth. If it is a front tooth, you will have a temporary tooth for the area during the healing phase. After the implant is healed, the post can be placed which protrudes above the gums and will hold the new tooth. It is now time for Dr. Kenny to make you a beautiful crown that will rest on this post and restore your mouth to its original function.

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    Tooth Colored Fillings

Implants

One of the most common procedures performed by the dentist is to restore decayed teeth with a filling. Until about 20 years ago, back teeth (molars and bicuspids) were routinely restored with dark, mercury-containing amalgam fillings. In its day, this was a great restoration. However, advances in dental materials have made it so that this is no longer the restorative material of choice. Amalgam fillings have even become "taboo" due to the emission of mercury vapors from the filling as it wears down over time.

Most dentists who are on the cutting edge now use a restorative material called composite (dental plastic) to fill teeth. Composite material matches the color of teeth, and therefore, is often referred to as tooth colored filling. A tooth might be diagnosed as needing a composite filling due to.....

  • initial decay
  • an old filling that is leaking and getting new decay but there is still enough tooth structure to warrant a filling instead of a crown
  • a broken or chipped tooth
  • to improve the contour or function of a tooth
  • to replace unsightly and unhealthy old amalgam fillings
  • to fill in gumline abrasions and erosions.

Using composite to fill teeth is ideal because the material is chemically bonded to the tooth so it actually reinforces and strengthens the tooth. The old silver fillings (amalgams) were mechanically retained. This meant that additional tooth structure had to be removed to create undercuts to help hold onto the filling. With composites, now fillings can be more conservative since they don't rely on mechanical retention. Another significant advantage with composite fillings is that they more closely match the expansion and contraction of natural tooth structure in response to temperature changes during eating. Amalgams, however, expand and contract more than natural teeth which causes the teeth to crack from these forces. Many teeth with old silver fillings end up needing crowns because of this. Some people choose to have their old silver fillings removed as a preventative measure. And, it almost goes without saying that the esthetics of composite over any other type of filling material is far superior.

Composites represent a great advance in dentistry. The composite materials and associated bonding agents are constantly being upgraded and modified. Dr. Kenny stays current on these changes and employs new material and techniques that are proven to be advantageous to the patient.

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    Root Canal Therapy

Root Canal Therapy

Having a root canal done on a tooth means that the soft innermost core of the tooth, the pulp, is removed while the rest of the tooth stays intact. When a tooth needs a root canal, the nerve (pulp) has been damaged either by decay or by trauma and that nerve must be removed. There are only two ways to remove a tooth nerve......a root canal which removes just the nerve of the tooth or an extraction which removes the entire tooth. So, having a root canal means that you get to keep your natural tooth. After having a root canal, the top of the tooth will then need to be covered and protected by a crown.

Signs and Symptoms for Possible Root Canal Therapy:

  • An abscess (or pimple) on the gums
  • Sensitivity to hot and cold and pressure
  • Toothache
  • Swelling or tenderness
  • Sometimes no symptoms are present. The dentist diagnoses the problem during routine x-ray examination.

Reasons for Root Canal Therapy:

  • Decay has reached the nerve of the tooth
  • Injury or trauma to the tooth (often times during sports)
  • Grinding or clenching

What Does Root Canal Therapy Involve?

Root canal treatment usually involves 1-3 appointments depending upon the amount of infection present, the difficulty of access and the size and number of canals. The root canal can be performed by either a general dentist or a root canal specialist called an endodontist.

The tooth is numbed and then a rubber sheet (called a rubber dam) is placed over the tooth to isolate that tooth from contamination of saliva. An opening is made into the inner core of the tooth and the pulp (nerve and blood supply to the tooth) is completely removed. If there is a lot of infection and the root canal system cannot be dried due to seepage, then the tooth is temporized and the root canal must be continued 1-2 weeks later when the infection has had time to heal. When the root canal system of the tooth can be completely dried, the procedure is finished by filling those canals with an inert, biocompatible substance (usually gutta percha) to seal the tips of the roots from further infection.

Root canal therapy is highly successful and usually lasts a lifetime, although on occasion, a tooth may have to be retreated due to a new infection.

Once the root canal treatment is complete, the tooth must then be covered and protected with a full coverage crown. If the root canal treated tooth is not covered by a crown, the patient runs a huge risk of fracturing the tooth beyond repair. What a shame it would be to have a root canal done to save a tooth and then end up losing it because the tooth was never covered with a crown!

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    Dentures & Partials

Dentures & Partials

If life were perfect, no one would ever lose a single tooth. But, that is not reality. Situations occur that lead to tooth loss and, fortunately, patients have many replacement options available to them. One of these options is replacement with dentures, full or partial depending on whether there are any remaining teeth. A full denture is used to replace all of the teeth in an arch, plus the supporting tissues, while a partial denture is used to replace teeth when one or more teeth still remain in that arch.


Full Denture

A full denture is a removable appliance that serves to replace teeth when the patient is completely edentulous (without teeth) in an arch (upper or lower). The denture also replaces the appearance of surrounding gum tissue as it fits past where the teeth used to be and into the area where the cheek meets with the bone. A denture is vital to help the patient eat, talk and smile with confidence. Often times, a denture can be made to help support the lips and cheeks better, thereby, taking years off the patient's appearance. Getting a new full denture (when the patient is already edentulous) takes about 5 appointments and 3-4 weeks, start to finish. One of those 5 appointments is called a "try-in" where the patient gets to see what their new teeth will look like before the denture is processed. This gives the patient complete control over the esthetics of their new appliance.

If a patient still has some natural teeth that need to be removed, they have the option of having an "immediate" denture. This means that the new denture is placed in the mouth at the same appointment that the teeth are removed. This denture is worn during the healing phase after the extractions. In this way, the patient never has to be without teeth. The down side to this is that it is impossible to have a "try-in" so the patient does not have as much input on the looks of the denture. The tissues will shrink considerably during healing and this denture will either have to be relined or a new one made 4-6 months later.

Dr. Kenny has had great success over the years with placing patients in comfortable, secure and esthetically pleasing full dentures.

Partials

A partial denture, more commonly referred to as a partial, is a removable appliance that replaces one or more teeth in an arch (upper or lower) that still has some remaining healthy teeth. The partial has clasps, either metal or invisible acrylic, that clasp onto some of the remaining teeth for support. A partial can greatly improve a patient's ability to eat and function and they can be made to be virtually invisible.

Since a partial relies on your natural teeth for support, it is important that you see Dr. Kenny regularly so that those teeth remain healthy and continue to function as holders for your partial for a very long time.

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    Full Mouth Rehabilitation

Full Mouth Rehabilitation

There are very few dentists that possess the skill and confidence required to perform a full mouth rehabilitation. Dr. Kenny has successfully completed many of these amazing transformations over the years. There are 3 main reasons that a person might need this service......




  • the teeth have excessive wear and may even be shortened and flattened off....excessive wear and decreased tooth height causes degenerative damage to the jaw joint
  • patient has lost many teeth; things have shifted and the bite is now greatly compromised
  • teeth are crooked, discolored and worn and the patient desires a beautiful smile to bolster confidence and take years off their appearance

How is a Full Mouth Rehabilitation Done?

Performing a full mouth rehabilitation from start to finish takes about 3 months. The first 4-6 weeks are spent wearing a mouth splint that puts the patient's jaw in the desired bite relationship. This tests the jaw joint's tolerance to the proposed new bite. While it is important to do this 100% reversible step, Dr. Kenny's experience has been that in EVERY case the patients have reported an increase in comfort that they did not know was lacking or possible.

Once the joint has been tested in this manner, the back teeth are all prepared for their restorations in a single visit. The patient then wears these crowns for a couple of weeks (prior to altering the front teeth) to make sure that the bite is perfect. The final step is to place beautiful restorations on the front teeth. So, while the time span, start to finish, is a little lengthy, not too much of that time is actually spent in the dental office. It is possible to complete this task with as few as 6 office visits. What a life changing procedure in a short period of time and all with no invasive surgery!

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    Bite Appliances for TMJ Treatment

Full Mouth Rehabilitation

TMJ DISORDERS

TMJ is an acronym for the Temporomandibular Joint. TMJ has been used by many people through the years to actually describe TMD which is an acronym for Temporomandibular Joint Disorder. So, TMJ is just the name of the joint, while TMD means that there is a disorder of the joint. TMD describes many symptoms related to the jaw and supporting structures. This disorder is a subgroup of Orofacial Pain Disorder that include many different types of pain in the head & neck. The TM Joint itself is located directly in front of the ear and is commonly called the "jaw joint". Common symptoms of TM disorders are pain or discomfort around the ear, jaw joints, facial muscles, headaches, temple pain, throat pain, pain with opening, chewing, locking, limited opening, clicking, popping, and grating noises. If you have any of these symptoms greater than a month, you should seek treatment from your dentist.


TMJ TREATMENT APPLIANCE

Full Mouth Rehabilitation

In almost every case of TMJ disorder, the first step in treatment is the custom fabrication and use of a bite appliance often called a biteguard, nightguard or occlusal splint. When properly fabricated by a dentist, this appliance places the lower jaw in a position that is most amenable to destressing the cartilage and musculature of the temporomandibular joint. The appliance also protects the teeth from the damage done by bruxing (grinding) and clenching. There is a tremendous difference between custom fabricated TMD appliances and over-the-counter boil and bite guards (which should only be used for protecting the teeth during contact sporting activities). Over-the-counter guards can often times cause TMD to worsen because they place the lower jaw in a position that stresses the joint and associated musculature. So, be sure to consult with Dr. Kenny if you have any questions or concerns about TMJ disorder, grinding or clenching.

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    Extractions

Extractions









Certainly, our goal is to prevent tooth loss. However, it sometimes becomes necessary to remove a tooth due to.....

  • trama
  • severe decay
  • advanced periodontal disease (gum disease)
  • infection (abscess)
  • fracture of the tooth or root
  • prior to treatment of oral cancer
  • as part of a comprehensive orthodontic treatment plan prior to placing braces
  • And in almost all people, the dentist will recommend removal of all 4 of your wisdom teeth.

In all of these scenarios, tooth removal will only be recommended if it is the best or only treatment alternative; for example, if a tooth is absolutely non restorable, if orthodontic results will be compromised without removing 1-4 teeth, or if wisdom teeth will not have enough room and will have the potential for causing infection, etc.

If a tooth needs to be extracted (removed), the dentist will determine if that extraction will be done in her/his office or will be referred to an oral surgeon. That decision is always made in the best interest of the patient. Once a tooth is removed, the patient receives a list of do's and don'ts for proper care of the extraction site. It is very important to follow these instructions to help insure problem-free healing.

And, once a tooth is removed, the patient should strongly consider the timely placement of a bridge or implant to replace the missing tooth, where applicable of course.

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    Routine & Deep Cleaning

Routine & Deep Cleaning

Dr. Kenny feels very strongly about the link between oral health and overall body health. Oral health, or lack there of, has been linked to systemic illnesses such as coronary artery disease (heart disease), stroke, diabetes and even low birth weight in babies born to mothers with poor oral health. Therefore, Dr. Kenny and her staff will strive to work with you to help you achieve optimal oral health, which means not just great teeth but also healthy gums and bone.

Of course, the first step toward oral health is a complete exam with x-rays to determine what type of cleaning is best for you. If it's been a while since you last saw a dentist, you may need more than a simple routine cleaning. The different type of cleanings that may be diagnosed for you are:..

  • Routine, single appointment cleaning
  • Cleaning I and II which requires a second cleaning appointment about 1 week after the first cleaning appointment
  • Deep Cleaning with anesthesia which requires 3 visits with about 1 week in between appointments

Once you have completed your appropriate cleanings, Dr. Kenny will then recommend a recare frequency that is best for you. For most people, having a dental cleaning every 6 months is adequate (that is the minimum standard of care). However, for some, it may be better to return every 4 months (or 3 times per year) or maybe even every 3 months (or 4 times per year). If you needed a deep cleaning, then an initial recare cycle of every 3 months is highly recommended. It is important to understand that your gums and bone are the support tissues for your teeth. Perfectly healthy teeth can be lost if the support tissues (gums and bone) are not healthy

In addition to caring for your gums, there are several other big benefits to seeking routine cleanings and examinations. They include:..

  • early detection of tooth problems so that repair is easier and less expensive
  • screening for Oral Cancer at every recare appointment
  • measurements to check for periodontal health are done once per year
  • hygiene home care instructions can be given upon request (including the value of cleaning your tongue for fresher breath).

While it is our job to recommend treatment that is necessary to achieve optimal health, we will be glad to accommodate you with any modified plan that you are comfortable with.

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Office Hours

Monday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Tuesday 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Wednesday 7:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Thursday 7:00 AM - 1:00 PM